Australian Social Media Statistics Compendium

With so many new social sites emerging it is very important for marketers to have Australian specific intelligence to determine which channels are the most attractive to pursue as part of your marketing strategy.

I have collated a summary of the key community sites in Australia (exc social news site), to aid your decision making and assist to develop a strong business case to drive the “social” agenda in your organisation.

Why should organisations invest in a social media strategy?

At a recent marketing seminar it was identified that only 18% of all organisations have a social media strategy. Thus for those which need to understand more about the importance of social media here are a few statistics;

In Australia, one in two Australians use social networking sites, such as Facebook or MySpace. On average Australians are members of 2.7 different sites, with the global average membership at 2.5 different sites. 8% of the time Australians spend on the internet is on social networking sites and each session on these sites range between 20 – 30 minutes in length. These statistics demonstrate the “need” to be where your target market is spending their time on the web. In addition it demonstrates the time people are investing in their online relationships. Time which can often influence users decisions on a range of topics and products.

But are web users that bothered to discuss brands? Nielsen recently published figures which suggests that;

Two in five (41 per cent) published opinions specifically about brands, while more than twice as many (86 per cent) read such content.

Social Networking Sites;
Facebook

Facebook has become the most popular social networking site in Australia as many users have started to desert MySpace for Facebook.
Members: 5 million users in Australia – May 2009
User Profile;
Gender: 57% female / 43% male
Household Income: 56% of users have a household income of above $75,000 and 34% of users have a household income above $100,000.
Average Time on Site; According to Hitwise Facebook members spent 21 minutes and 15 seconds on the site.
Other Interesting Information; Facebook has 38% reach of Australians online according to the Nielsen Globalfaces report.

MySpace
Members: 2.1 million Australian users
User Profile;
Age:
According to Nielsen Netratings MySpace Australia’s target audience is not as skewed towards the older demographic as it is in the US. 48% of Australian visits are aged below 25.
Gender: 59% female / 41% male
Household Income: 52% of site users have a household income of $35,000 – $75,000. Only 19% have a household income above $100,000.
Monthly Unique Visitors: According to Nielsen Online, MySpace attracted 2,362,000 visitors in December and on average a MySpace user views 252 pages.
Average Time on Site; 27 minutes and 46 seconds

When comparing Facebook and MySpace it is obvious that the Facebook demographic represents a high portion of professional / mid – high income earners whilst MySpace appeals to a younger less affluent audience.

Bebo
According to the Nielsen GlobalFaces report in March 2009, Bebo is the 3rd largest social network in Australia. However Bebo’s early success in Australia in 2007 has since diminished. Bebo is still the 3rd most popular however Friendster is hot on its heels.

Members: In late 2007 it was 2.8 million (unfortunately I cannot source an updated figure).
User Profile:
Gender: 68% female / 32% male
Age: Those 12 – 24 represent 76% of total network members
Average Time Per Site: 25 minutes per session

Friendster
Members: 1 million users in Australia
User Profile:
Gender: 57% male / 43% female
Age: 43% of network users are 18 – 24 and 33% are 25 – 34.
Average Time Per Site: 15 minutes 40 seconds per session

Twitter
Members: 249,000 February 2009
Growth: Traffic from Australia to Twitter grew by 1,067% from the beginning of 2009. Twitter is now the 37th most visited web site in Australia – moving from position 81 in February.
User Profile;
Gender: 57% male / 43% female
Age: 29% are aged 35 – 44 and 18% are aged 45 – 54.
Household Income: 71% of all users have a household income greater than $50K and 50% are over $75,000.
Average Time on Site; 13 minutes 10 seconds

Other Important Information; Global figures show the retention rate of Twitter is approximately 40%, whilst it is 70% on Facebook & MySpace. More than 60% of Twitter users are said to deflect from the site within 1 month. With the rate in which membership has grown in Australia, it is believed that the retention rate may be higher than that of the global average however it is still an important consideration when trying to develop online relationships with your consumers.

Whilst not as affluent or highly educated as LinkedIn members (refer below), Twitter’s profile does demonstrate similarities with the LinkedIn profile. Whilst Twitter promotes itself as a social messaging facility it has obviously been embraced by many professionals and entrepreneurs. As a result, Twitter is useful for both B2C & B2B markets.

Professional Networking Sites
LinkedIn

Members: 637,000 Australian users.
Growth: 23% increase in members over the past 8 months
User Profiles:
Gender: 62% male / 38% female
Education; 80% of users have further education (diploma/degree/masters)
Average household income; $109, 703 & 34% own a PDA
Average age; 41 years old

Xing is another professional network however it has not gained traction in the Australian marketplace thus has not been covered in this article.

Do you have any statistics that I have missed, if so please share them below.

© Digital Marketing Lab Blog

CATEGORY: Social Media | POSTED BY: Teresa Sperti | COMMENTS (1)
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One Response to Australian Social Media Statistics Compendium

  1. work at home says:

    Very good work, interesting post, bookmarked !

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