5 Ways Local & Global Brands Are Using Foursquare

Foursquare Marketing

Locally and globally Foursquare is taking off. Whilst the platform is yet to go mainstream, its now 2.6 million users (reached in mid August) is rising fast and unlike when Facebook / Twitter growth begun – intelligent marketers are already starting to unleash the platform to achieve a range of marketing objectives. This article covers 4 different ways brands have used Foursquare locally and global to connect with their audience;

Wagamama RestaurantFoursquare For Retention: Wagamama’s (Local Example)

Wagamama is using the geo-location service to drive repeat patronage to its stores in the local market. Wagamama’s offers visitors instant offers such as a complementary soup with every main meal for every 5th check in to rewards its loyal consumers.

However it is not just repeat purchases that are giving Wagamama’s the edge. Through its marketing on Foursquare, Wagamama has access to range of real-time information about its customers including who has ‘checked in’ to its noodle bars, when they arrived, the male to female customer ratio and which times of day are more active for certain customers, who the most frequent visitors to the restaurant are etc. This provides Wagamama’s with a new level of insight into its consumers – as well as a mechanism to monitor satisfied or unsatisfied consumers.

Read more here: http://www.revium.com.au/articles/blog/using-foursquare-for-marketing/

Foursquare For PR Stunts: Microsoft (Local Example)

In June this year, Microsoft organised a mayor meet up in Sydney to promote the launch of their new Office 2010 product. 141 Foursquare users checked-in to Martin Place where the event was held. Whilst the number of individuals involved is relatively small this campaign created a buzz in the media as it was one of the first of its kind in Australia.
Read more here; http://mumbrella.com.au/141-turn-out-for-microsoft-mayor-swarm-as-vibe-gets-into-foursquare-too-28302

Foursquare For Upsell: Domino’s (UK Example)

In the UK, Domino’s credits much of its revenue growth to its investment in social media – namely Facebook and Foursquare. Domino’s launched a check-in promotion, which enabled consumers to receive a side dish when they spent £10 or more at a Domino’s store. Since it launched its ongoing Foursquare check-in promotion Domino’s have received 10,000 check-ins, 3,500 of which are unique.

Read more here: http://www.clickz.com/clickz/news/1725326/dominos-uk-uses-facebook-foursquare-drive-web-orders

Gap Foursquare EventFoursquare For Acquisition: Gap & Ann Taylor Discounts (US Example)

On the 14th of August 2010, Gap utilised foursquare to drive foot-traffic into selected stores. Titled the “The BlackMagic Event”, Gap offered patrons who checked into Foursquare a 25% discount off selected clothing. However this is not the only promotion of its kind other fashion retailers in the US have used Foursquare to drive both acquisition and retention. Ann Taylor offered 25% off to Foursquare mayors and 15% off to each customer on his or her fifth check-in. These deals are great for retailers because those Foursquare users’ friends would see that they’re checking in, giving the stores some exposure.

Read more here: http://thenextweb.com/location/2010/08/14/gap-running-25-off-promotion-today-for-facebook-twitter-and-foursquare-users/

Foursquare For Brand Engagement: Jimmy Choo & Barbie (UK & US Example)
Jimmy Choo the world renowned footwear brand launched a treasure hunt on the streets of London. Rather than utilise a discount style promotion, Jimmy Choo created a social game in the real world. Jimmy Choo utilised a pair of their sneakers as a Foursquare user and these shoes checked into venues around London and the first Foursquare user to find the sneakers at the latest location would win a pair of their own. And it seems that Barbie has now followed in Jimmy Choo’s footsteps. To coincide with the launch of the new video Barbie, Mattel has launched a Foursquare scavenger hunt across 4 US states – requiring participants to complete location based tasks to win 1 of 14 prizes.

Read more here: http://mashable.com/2010/04/27/foursquare-jimmy-choo/
Read more here: http://www.thedefectorsblog.com.au/communications/barbie-doll-foursquare

There are many other campaigns launched by brands around the world click here to find out more click here –
http://www.pathinteractive.com/blog/2010/06/top-ten-foursquare-campaigns/

Watch: How to Unlock Your World with Foursquare

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On The Digital Politics Campaign Trail With Some Clever Little Lemons

Days of Digital Politics

Since my previous post it seems that both political parties have really taken their online marketing efforts up a notch. Julia Gillard’s Twitter following has ballooned in a short few months – growing to 36,000 followers, and both parties are adopting paid search to educate the Australian public about their stance on the big issues.

What however initially struck me about the marketing efforts (both online and offline marketing) of both political parties, is that political marketing hasn’t really changed over the past decade. We see the same ads on TV ridiculing the opposition and the same brash push marketing tactics that attempt to scare us into choosing 1 party over another. Well so I thought anyway.

Labour Lemons YouTube Video’s

Labour Lemons Youtube ChannelIt is refreshing to see that at least 1 party is leveraging the online channel in a way that is engaging the Australian public. The Liberal Party has decided to use YouTube as 1 of the channels in the marketing mix to market itself and they are doing so in a unique way. Liberalparty.tv has released a series of humorous and entertaining videos – featuring what they term the “Labour Lemons”.

With 3 videos released so far – the Labour Lemon video series seem to be making a few waves on YouTube. Together the 3 videos have received over 130,000 views and with the 3rd released as late as last Friday the 5th of August, this is sure to increase. These videos have outperformed the standard propaganda style marketing video content so often seen in politics and I no doubt believe given the success so far that we will probably see 1 more released before election day.

To view all of the videos in the series click here – http://www.youtube.com/user/LiberalPartyTV

Getting the most out of video

YouTube if leveraged in the right way can provide political marketers with a valuable channel to get their message to the masses. YouTube receives over 12 million unique Australian visitors per month and is obviously one of the ideal mediums for political parties to communicate their message. In this instance the “Labour Lemons” video series lends itself well to the social space – as content that is interesting or entertaining enough moves virally through popular social networks.

However I do feel there is more that the Liberal Party could be doing to gain maximum reach for their video content in the run up to the election. The first is utilising YouTube’s promotional opportunities to increase awareness and eyeballs to the content. Just last month we saw Cadbury trial a 1 day homepage buy out on YouTube – an opportunity which provides a brand with exposure to millions of Australians visiting YouTube daily. In addition the Labour Party is using sponsored video links in YouTube search results to promote its video’s on YouTube – an opportunity that the Liberal Party is yet to explore. Through greater awareness of these video’s, the Liberal Party would most likely see the viral effect treble.

Aside from online activity – it would be great to see the Liberal Party using these video’s as part of their TVCs to adopt a more integrated approach. Earlier this year we saw ANZ very successfully extend the reach of their offline “bank world” TVCs through YouTube.

With that said, I applaud the Liberal Party for trying something a little bit different and breaking the political marketing mould.

Have you seen some interesting and unique ways that either political party is leveraging the online channel? If so please share them below.

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4 C’s To Build Compelling Content Online

Content is King

It has been said that the brands that will succeed and thrive in the coming decade will be those who become publishers. Content is becoming one of the key pillars of any online strategy as it is utilised to drive organic search tactics, forms a key part of social media activities and is also being used to position brands as experts and a trusted source in their field. This content wave is one that has not gone un-noticed by Australian organisations.

The importance organisations are placing on content is is reflected by the increasing demand for content specialists and producers. Content generation is however is more than hiring dedicated resources to support the cause and deliver tangible outcomes. So if you are contemplating content as part of your strategy – here are my 4 Cs to produce interesting content online. This is not intended to be an exhaustive list but rather is some of the major factors that can be the difference between a successful content strategy or no more than online dribble.

1. Content Trending & Monitoring

Monitoring what is topical in your industry and forecasting what will be topical in the coming months is one of the keys to producing relevant and timely content for your audience. Social news and bookmarking sites as well as social media monitoring tools enable us to determine what is popular and what our audience is likely to be seeking content for. Content trending and monitoring is also about learning from the content your users are consuming. What kind of articles and topics do your users respond well to and how can you give them more of it? Both of these sources of intelligence form an integral part of any content planning and creation process.

2. Cutting Edge

Digital Blog TrendsThe content arena is vast and often your organisation will be competing against a mass of content related to your product / service or industry. One of the fundamental things to therefore consider is how are you going to build cutting edge content that will keep people coming back for more? When I set out blogging there were 2 key things that defined my content position / edge in the market;

– Local Statistics & Trends; Stats and trends for Australia’s digital market were and still are difficult to come by. Searching for them is time consuming and they are rarely found in 1 single source thus my first edge was to deliver marketers with this source on an ongoing basis to support business case development.

– Client Side Marketing View; Many of the digital blogs that are written are done so by agency professionals who experience very different challenges to client side marketers. I wanted to cover the topics and issues that client marketers face to enable them to make more informed decisions in their role.

Defining your content edge requires you to define boundaries for topics – to identify what you will and will not cover. To do this you need to effectively scope your market and find your edge. Aside from this the other key to producing edgy content is to ensure that you are not simply re-gurgitation the same news and content as everyone else. If its topical use it as a base and re-package it to add new information and value to your users.

3. Content Fatigue

One of the hardest things about developing strong content online is maintaining a constant flow of quality content. The first 6 months is the easy bit, it is after this time where it becomes more difficult. A solid content strategy must consider source and define avenues for content generation and contribution. Below is content source diagram which defines some of the key avenues I use to create compelling content beyond the honeymoon period.

4. Content Distribution

Great content is only great if people can find it and it supports the achievement of your organisations goals. Like any marketing a creative idea is never enough – it is as much about the distribution as it is about the idea thus what is your distribution strategy?

Distribution extends well beyond social sharing buttons. A content strategy should be integrated within your existing communication strategies such as your email lifecycle and also be used to drive sign ups to your database. Your content should also be optimised for search and even paid search may be used as a form to drive users to the content. Your content may also feed into your social profiles – however ensure that this is not the sole purpose of your social profile.

Australian Examples

So with that said – just who in Australia is delivering a good content strategy. Below are 2 examples;
– Blackmores; For a little while now Blackmores has been delivering quality content in the form of health and weight-loss advice to their users. The value delivered through content has been one of the key online value propositions used by Blackmores to build a substantial database of existing and prospective customers.

– Coles; Coles have developed an online content strategy in line with their offline activities. Their content strategy revolves around recipes and cooking tips from Curtis Stone. Coles has tapped into Australia’s cooking obsession and provides hints and tips as well as recipes to cook like a professional or on a budget. This is enabling Coles to build a sticky onsite experience and get people back into Coles supermarkets – a tactic which I am sure is delivering success for the supermarket giant.

I would love to know of more organisations using content to support the achievement of online objectives – thus please share them below.

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